stroke1

A stroke is a brain attack
For your brain to function, it needs a constant blood supply, which provides vital nutrients and oxygen to the brain cells. A stroke happens when the blood supply to part of the brain is cut off and brain cells are damaged or die.

About a third of people who have a stroke make a significant recovery within a month. But most stroke survivors will have long-term problems. It may take a year or longer for them to make the best possible recovery. Sadly, in the most severe cases, strokes can be fatal or cause long-term disability.

Strokes are sudden and have an immediate effect
A person may become numb, weak or paralysed on one side of the body. They may slur their speech and find it difficult to find words or understand speech. Some people lose their sight or have blurred vision, and others become confused or unsteady.

A stroke can damage mind and body
Strokes affect people in different ways, depending on the part of the brain that is affected, how widespread the damage is and how healthy the person was before the stroke. But strokes can damage:

  • bodily functions
  • our thought processes
  • our ability to learn, and
  • how we feel and communicate.

Recovering from a stroke takes time
About a third of people who have a stroke make a significant recovery within a month. But most stroke survivors will have long-term problems. It may take a year or longer for them to make the best possible recovery. Sadly, in the most severe cases, strokes can be fatal or cause long-term disability.

A stroke is always a medical emergency
It is important to be able to recognise symptoms of a stroke and to get help immediately.

Source: This information is based on original information provided by the Stroke Association in the UK. However, as the original Stroke Association information has been translated and adapted, the Stroke Association holds no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the stroke information on the Innovage site.

There are two main types of stroke.

stroke2Ischaemic strokes happen when something blocks an artery that carries blood to the brain. There are several possible causes:

  • a blood clot forms in a main artery to the brain
  • a blood clot, air bubble or fat globule forms in a blood vessel and is carried to the brain
  • there is a blockage in the tiny bloody vessels deep inside the brain.

 

stroke3Haemorrhagic strokes happen when a blood vessel bursts and bleeds into the brain (a haemorrhage). The haemorrhage may be due to:a vessel bursting within the brain itself, or a blood vessel on the surface of the brain bleeding into the area between the brain and the skull.

Temporary symptoms may indicate a mini-stroke
Sometimes the blockage in the blood supply to the brain is temporary, and a person will have the symptoms of a stroke for a short time. This is called a transient ischaemic attack (TIA) or mini stroke. A TIA is a sign that part of the brain is not getting enough blood, and there is a risk of a more serious stroke in future. As with major strokes, you must seek medical attention immediately.

Source: This information is based on original information provided by the Stroke Association in the UK. However, as the original Stroke Association information has been translated and adapted, the Stroke Association holds no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the stroke information on the Innovage site.

Your stay in hospital is only the start of your recovery.
There are a range of longer-term problems that you might continue to face after you have left hospital.
Source: This information is based on original information provided by the Stroke Association in the UK. However, as the original Stroke Association information has been translated and adapted, the Stroke Association holds no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the stroke information on the Innovage site.

stroke4Stroke affects everybody differently, and it is difficult to say how much of a recovery is possible. Many stroke survivors experience the most dramatic recovery during their stay in hospital in the weeks after their stroke.
But many stroke survivors continue to improve over a longer time, sometimes over a number of years. Their recovery is in fact a long period of rehabilitation, as they learn to deal with the effects the stroke has had on them.
Rehabilitation is about getting back to normal life and living as independent a life as possible. It involves taking an active approach to ensuring that life goes on for people who have had a stroke. This can mean helping them to acquire new skills or relearn old ones. It may involve helping them adapt to the limitations caused by stroke. Or it can mean helping them find social, emotional and practical support.

Source: This information is based on original information provided by the Stroke Association in the UK. However, as the original Stroke Association information has been translated and adapted, the Stroke Association holds no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the stroke information on the Innovage site.

There are many factors that can increase your risk of stroke, including:stroke 5

  • your genes
  • your age
  • your diet
  • the amount of alcohol you drink
  • whether you smoke
  • how fit you are, and
  • whether you have any other medical conditions.

But there are simple lifestyle changes you can make to reduce the risk of stroke.

Source: This information is based on original information provided by the Stroke Association in the UK. However, as the original Stroke Association information has been translated and adapted, the Stroke Association holds no responsibility or liability for the accuracy of the stroke information on the Innovage site.

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Stroke Association, in the UK.Visit the site...